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The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’
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The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’  The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’  The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’  The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’  The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’  The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’  The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’  The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’  The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’  The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’
Item:

The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 Stanley Mound Military Medal group to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to state ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’

Product Code: CMA/17680
Price: £9,500.00
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The exceptional and important Defence of Hong Kong Christmas Eve 24th December 1941 seizure of Stanley Mound Military Medal group awarded to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Drum Major C.D. Goddard, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, late 1st Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, who manned Pill Box 33, and harangued some Canadians who he then led to press home an attack at bayonet point leading one Canadian to remember ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack, but the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’ 

Group of 7: Military Medal, GVI 1st type bust; (6202957 CPL. C.D. GODDARD. MIDDX. R.); British Empire Medal, EIIR Cypher; (23465012 SGT. CHARLES D. GODDARD. M.M. R.IR.F., T.A.); 1939-1945 Star; Pacific Star; Defence Medal; War Medal; Efficiency Medal, EIIR Dei. Grat. bust, T. & A.V.R. suspension; (23465012 W.O.CL.2. C.D. GODDARD. M.M. B.E.M. 5 R.IR.F.), mounted court style for wear / display.

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Together with the following original items and ephemera:

Buckingham Palace Forwarding Letter for the British Empire Medal, bearing facsimile signature of Queen Elizabeth, issued to Sergeant Charles D. Goddard, M.M., B.E.M. The Royal Irish Fusiliers (Princess Victoria’s) Territorial Army. This with its original envelope.

Soldier’s Service and Pay Book.

Regular Army Certificate of Service Red Book.

A most unusual and interesting soldier’s aluminium mess tin, the base privately inscribed with the device of the 57th Foot (Middlesex Regiment) and additionally inscribed: ‘Hong Kong Far East P.B.33 Cpl Goddard. L/C Pennick, Ptes. Funnell; Gentry; Pope; Webster; Ptes. Francome; Morley; Remer killed in action; Riddell; Wilderpin. 1941 Dec. 8th – 25th’. The ‘P.B.33’ stands for Pillbox 33 which Goddard and his section manned.

A very fine Territorial Army 5th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers Recruiting Poster titled: ‘Did You have a Free Holiday at Blackpool this year? We Did! Join the 5th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers (T.A.), bearing image of the battalion pipe band marching in front of the Blackpool Cenotaph, the Bandmaster clearly shown wearing the Military Medal and Pacific Star combination, this being Goddard. A rare poster to survive.

Hardback book titled: ‘The Fall of Hong Kong’ by Tim Carew, 1st Edition, published 1960, the inside front page inscribed in ink: ‘For “Pop” Goddard. Who was there – so he’ll know. Best wishes from Tim Carew. Nov. 1960’. Goddard is featured as one of three soldiers of special note in Carew’s dedication, and his action is mentioned in detail on pages 182 to 185. Cover now repaired.

Front cover of the newspaper ‘The Armagh Guardian and South Tyrone News’ for 24th November 1960 – with title: ‘Ex-Japanese P.O.W. Re-lives War Years’, the picture showing Goddard reading the above mentioned book, and telling some of his story.

Recipient’s obituary, newspaper cutting.

Also photocopies of a book of verse which Goddard compiled in way of memory of his colleagues.

Charles Douglas Goddard was born on 24th June 1920, and came from Croydon, Surrey, and then enlisted into the British Army direct from school, joining on 6th April 1936 when aged 16 as a Boy (No.6202957) the Middlesex Regiment.

Posted to the 1st Battalion, he saw service in Singapore from 5th February 1937, and in Hong Kong from 20th August 1937, and having attained the age of 18 then saw service as a Private from 24th June 1938, being appointed to Lance Corporal on 9th October 1939, and with the outbreak of the Second World War was still on service in Hong Kong, being there when the Japanese eventually declared war in 1941.

The Japanese crossed the border from China into the New Territories just as the news of Pearl Harbour was reaching the outside world. Warned by good intelligence, Hong Kong’s defenders were all in position.

Waiting for the Japanese on the Mainland that December 8th were the Mainland Brigade, consisting of three of the four most experienced infantry battalions available to the garrison, the 2nd Royal Scots, the 5/7th Rajputs, and the 2/14th Punjabis. Supporting them were No. 1 Company Hong Kong Volunteer Defence Corps (HKVDC), mobile guns of the Hong Kong Singapore Royal Artillery (HKSRA), and elements of all units necessary to support an army in the line. All came under the command of Brigadier Wallis.

The main weight of the defenders manned the Gin Drinkers Line (the one, weakly prepared, defensive line across the Mainland). It had not even been intended to defend this line until the unexpected arrival of two Canadian battalions (the Winnipeg Grenadiers and the Royal Rifles of Canada) just three weeks before. These two battalions, in conjunction with the 1st Middlesex (arguably the best prepared of all the infantry battalions) made up the Island Brigade under Brigadier Lawson.

Forward of the Gin Drinkers Line, C Company Punjabis and elements of the Royal Engineers had already started fighting a delaying rearguard action, blowing up bridges and tunnels in front of the advancing Japanese.

These pre-dawn activities were out of sight and out of mind as far as Hong Kong’s citizens were concerned, but the 08:00 bombing attack on Kai Tak Airfield, Sham Shui Po Barracks, and Kowloon changed all that. The Colony and its people now knew that war had arrived.

The key strongpoint of the Gin Drinkers Line – expected to hold out for at least a week – was the Shing Mun Redoubt. In the area of the line held by the Royal Scots, it was manned by A Company’s HQ and number 8 Platoon, and elements of 1 Mountain Battery HKSRA. The senior officer was A Company’s commander, Captain ‘Potato’ Jones.

Two hours after nightfall on December 9th, Japanese attacked the Redoubt from Needle Hill just to its north. ‘Redoubt’ is a poor term for a few pillboxes joined by concrete tunnels, surrounded by wire and manned by around 43 personnel. By early morning of the 10th, the Japanese held the position having killed 3, captured 27, and let 13 escape.

The Royal Scots fell back to the next high ground – Golden Hill. There were no defensive positions here, apart from a few scrapes, and the ground was as hard as rock. Early on December 11th the Japanese attacked – initially with mortars which inflicted horrific casualties as they burst on earth that was more like concrete.

The majority of the Royal Scots fell back in extreme disorder as a Japanese infantry attack followed, but D Company struck back and re-took the position. However, by this time it was clear that the Gin Drinkers Line had been irreconcilably compromised, and leaving 28 dead behind the Royal Scots were pulled off the hill.

Maltby, the GOC, had decided to evacuate all troops from the Mainland. Those holding the western part of the line were to fall back via the ferries of Tsim Sha Tsui, while those holding the east were to fall back via Devil’s Peak.

The evacuation proceeded smoothly, apart from a party of Punjabis who became lost and ended up forming a defensive barricade around the Star Ferry in Kowloon, holding off the Japanese while the last ferries left, and the Hong Kong Mule Company who had to leave most of their mules on the Mainland due to a lack of lighters to take them off.

By early on December 13th, the evacuation was over. In delaying the Japanese by five days, Maltby had lost just 66 dead from a total force of 14,000.

From December 13th, all that lay between the Japanese and Hong Kong Island was a narrow stretch of water. Armed with good intelligence, they took the opportunity to destroy much of the Island’s military infrastructure with shells and bombs. It became a war of counter-battery fire as the batteries on the Island fired back – though many were destroyed in the process.

With all forces back on the Island, there was a reorganization. Two new brigades were formed, East Brigade under Wallis and West Brigade under Lawson; the dividing line ran due south from the east side of Causeway Bay. East Brigade consisted of the Rajputs on the waterfront with the Royal Rifles and 1, 2, and 3, Coy HKVDC behind them, and West Brigade consisted of the Punjabis on the waterfront and the Winnipeg Grenadiers and 4, 5, and 7 Coy HKVDC behind them, with the Royal Scots forming a bridge between the two Indian battalions and 6 Coy HKVDC in a number of locations. The Middlesex manned the majority of the pillboxes defending the Island and therefore reported into both Brigades.

The scale of the shelling and bombing has long been underestimated. The whole north shore of the Island – from The Peak down to the waterfront – came under intense fire. Military areas were hit – Mount Davis Fort, Belchers, Pinewoods, troop concentrations, the pillboxes; institutions were hit – Central Police Station (two killed), Bowen Road Hospital (over 100 hits), the Royal Naval Hospital in Wanchai (over 100 hits), the Bank; and residential areas – rich and poor – were struck with great loss of life.

However, the biggest single explosion came not from enemy action but from a simple mistake. On the night of December 12th, the barge Jeanette, laden with tons of dynamite from Green Island, was accidentally fired on by Z Company Middlesex from pillbox 63. The resulting double explosion killed everyone on board and blew in most windows of Central district.

Twice the Japanese asked formally for surrender and were rejected. At least once they probed the north shore of the Island as a preparation for the invasion. Then, in a lucky strike (the smoke clearly visible in some aerial cine-film taken at the time) they set a paint factory and oil tanks in North Point ablaze.

By December 18th, the Island was a mess. Maltby had lost a further 54 dead, many of the pillboxes were useless, and the infrastructure was so badly damaged that it was almost impossible for vehicles to proceed down some of the northern streets such as King’s Road.

Among both officers and men, the only question is where the Japanese invasion will fall. Will it be Central? Not the best place for a landing, but with good embarkation points in Tsim Sha Tsui. Or will in be North Point? The shortest sea crossing, but much further from Victoria. By 19:30 on December 18th, the question would be answered.

Well before midnight on December 18th the 5/7th Rajputs ceased to exist as a fighting unit. Killed, wounded, captured, or simply isolated, they had been torn apart as the Japanese assault troops charged through them and made for higher ground. By dawn their assault has paused in the west thanks to the refusal of the HKVDC Hugheseliers to let them pass, but their penetration to the south has reached Wong Nai Chung Gap.

The whole of December 19th is dominated by the fighting for the Gap. Initially defended simply by Lawson’s West Brigade HQ, 3 Coy HKVDC, elements of 5AA regiment, elements of the HKSRA, and the HQ of D Company Winnipeg Grenadiers, the battle sucks in A Coy Winnipeg Grenadiers, the entire 2nd battalion Royal Scots, Royal Engineers, and many odds and sods. The Japanese are soon effectively in control, but the day results in 451 fatalities amongst the defenders, the majority in this little valley.

To avoid being cut off, Wallis ordered all elements of East Brigade to re-form in the hills north of Stanley. This well-chosen position would leave him in touch with West Brigade, with the insurance of the Stanley Peninsular to his south should he need to fall back. Unfortunately he did not know that Lawson had been killed at 07:00 that morning and thus West Brigade was not under effective control.

On December 20th A Company Punjabis was told to relieve the Repulse Bay Hotel which had come under attack that morning. At the same time East Brigade struck West along the same road. The Punjabis got no further than Shouson Hill, whose commanding peak was already held by the Japanese. East Brigade penetrated as far as the hotel and castle Eucliffe (just to the hotel’s south west) before coming to a halt thanks to Japanese forces on Middle Spur and Violet Hill.

On December 21st East Brigade made an individual attack on the Japanese holding Wong Nai Chung Gap. The plan was to drive north to Tai Tam Gap, then head due west via Gauge Basin to the area that how houses Park View. However, this attack was halted by strong Japanese resistance in the Red Hill area. Some elements were redirected via the Repulse Bay Hotel and made it as far north as The Ridge.

Meanwhile, the all-important north-south line had been stabilised thanks to the Middlesex on Leighton Hill. The Japanese desire to charge due west along the waterfront and take Victoria had been thwarted, thus their strategy change to forming a bulge in the hills (Mount Nicholson, Mount Cameron) south of the racecourse. With (from the Japanese point of view) Leighton Hill being impassable, and the Stanley area a sideshow, the focus became the Middle Gap – Wanchai Gap – Magazine Gap line from which they would be able to descend into the capital.

By December 23rd, as this bulge into West Brigade’s lines was being created, East Brigade had been squeezed into the Stanley Peninsular. While they would be able to take no more part in the battle for Hong Kong from this position, they were in arguably the best location for a long holdout.

It was on the 24th December, Christmas eve, the day before the official surrender, that Goddard would perform the action which led to the award of his Military Medal. During the defence of Hong Kong Island, Goddard who was serving in Lieutenant Blackabay’s 13 Platoon in “C” Company, was placed in command of Pillbox 33, together with the men listed on his mess tin, Lance Corporal Pennick, and Privates Funnell, Gentry, Pope, Webster, Francombe, Morley, Remer, Riddell, and Wilderpin. They manned this posted from the 8th to 25th December. 13 Platoon itself was tasked with manning Pillboxes 31, 32 and 33. According to one reference, Pillbox 33 was located at Tung Ah Pui village on the Shek O Penisular on the south of Hong Kong Island and away from the main city. It is still viewable to this day. The Middlesex Regiment History states that the pill box was near to Stanley View, located to the east of Repulse Bay and west of Shek O and adjacent to Chung Hom Kok. Between the 8th and 24th December, Goddard and his men whilst manning the pill box, endured almost continuous shelling and bombardment, with one man, Private Louis Remmer, being killed in action on 10th December as a result of this. The regimental history goes on to state that Goddard’s post ‘which was just east of the observation point, was attacked by the Japanese with rifle fire and grenades and the crew forced to withdraw. A counter-attack led by West, however, restored the position and drove off the enemy.’ But up till the 24th December, Goddard, according to his own statement, had not yet seen a Japanese soldier for real.

Located where his pillbox was, on south side of Hong Kong Island, and therefore away from the main area of direct threat, Goddard and his men found themselves sent to support a depleted company of the Royal Rifles of Canada, one of the two Canadian battalions present in the battle. The book ‘The Fall of Hong Kong’ by Tim Carew, pages 182 to 185 takes up the story.

‘To Corporal Charles Goddard of the 1st Middlesex the Canadians will always be an incalculable race. Goddard was not the only soldier in Hong Kong who found them so, for they were alternately demoralised and determined; cowardly and courageous; ill disciplined and fiercely self reliant. You never knew, said Goddard, whether a Winnipeg Grenadier or a Royal Rifleman of Canada would stage a one-man bayonet charge, save your life or run like hell. Goddard, nicknamed ‘Pop’ because of his premature baldness – had been in the army for eight years. He had started his military career as a band boy, but the best efforts of the bandmaster, accompanied by the direst threats, had done nothing to make him an accomplished saxophonist. During band practice at least half of his mind had strayed to a more practical weapon of war: the Vickers medium machine-gun.

After missing three whole bars of the Pomp and Circumstance march at an Officers’ Mess guest night, Goddard got his wish and was transferred out of the band to a machine-gun platoon. Goddard stands six feet three inches and weighs one hundred and ninety-six pounds, not an ounce of which is superfluous. He fought in the regimental boxing team as a heavyweight and performed prodigies of valour for the rugby football team in the middle of the back row. Goddard was pleased to hear that the Japanese had landed because for twelve days and nights he had been shelled and bombed in a pill-box without seeing a single Jap. This did not suit Goddard’s temperament and he said so with dogged persistence. His determination to get into battle drew from one of the more phlegmatic members of his section the statement that ‘old “Pop” wants to win this bloody war all on his own’. On 21st December, however, Corporal Goddard viewed his assignment with mixed displeasure.

His section had been detailed to provide support for a depleted company of the Royal Rifles of Canada. It was at once apparent to Goddard that these Canadians needed all the support they could get. They were in marked contrast to the cheerful, ribald and indomitable Cockneys of the Middlesex. These men of the Royal Rifles wanted no more part in this war: within a fortnight of their arrival in the Colony they had been bombed, shelled, sniped and thrown into costly and abortive counter-attacks. There was nothing glorious about the war they found themselves in: the men who had vociferously expressed their confidence in licking the pants off any goddam sonofabitch Jap was leaderless (their officers had all been killed), dispirited and demoralised. They lay around the foot of Stanley Mound in inert heaps, smoking alphabetically.

They were not advancing because they were too tired and had been without chow for twenty-four hours; in any case, no one had told them to advance. They were not retreating either, because they did not know where to retreat to. They should have been digging in, but the ground was rock hard and in any event they had no entrenching tools. They should have been doing something about the small party of Japanese established on the top of Stanley Mound, who sniped at them with insulting impunity. With rare effrontery a Japanese machine-gun sprayed them and sent them burrowing further into the inhospitable terrain. ‘I’m getting out of here,’ declared a disgruntled Private. ‘That’s a great idea,’ said his neighbour bitterly. ‘Where d’you figure on going?’

Goddard remembered the arrival of the Canadians: they had been confident and cheerful and had marched from the troopship with a springing quickstep. Now they were grey faced with fatigue, dirty, demoralised and fed-up – a miserable and dispirited rabble. Goddard put his section into position under the disinterested stare of the Canadians. ‘Just our luck to get lumbered with a bunch like this,’ said Private Milroy disgustedly. The other members of the section expressed their dissatisfaction in uncompromising terms: ‘We were supposed to leave the Japs to them.’ ‘Yes, promised us we wouldn’t never be needed.’ ‘Look at ‘em now….’ ‘Couldn’t fight their way out of a ---- paper bag.’

The Japanese machine-gun opened up again and the bullets whined spitefully over Goddard’s head. ‘Get on that gun,’ Goddard ordered Private Jack Millroy, ‘and give ‘em a few bursts. I’m going to find out who’s in command of this lot.’ ‘When you find him, tell him I want a posting,’ said Milroy. Goddard made a quick appreciation of the situation. The Japs, he judged, were not on Stanley Mound in any great force: indeed, judging from the volume of fire coming from the top, there could not be more than twenty of them. It was, he decided, a ticklish position but not one that sixty determined and well-led men could not take care of. With two platoons of ‘D’ Company he’d go up that hill like a dose of salts…. Goddard found a thin, sharp-featured sergeant sheltering in a small cave at the bottom of the slope. The sergeant was lighting a cigarette and regarded Goddard with open hostility. ‘You in command of these blokes?’ asked Goddard. ‘What’s that to you?’ countered the sergeant insultingly. ‘I asked you a question.’ ‘Yeah, I heard you. Now blow.’ Goddard tried another method. ‘You’re not just going to sit around and let those bastards snipe you, are you?’ he said. ‘If you wanna be a hero, then go right ahead,’ said the Sergeant indifferently. ‘Me, I like it here.’

In full view of a group of astonished Canadians, Goddard took two paces forward and lifted the sergeant bodily off the ground by the front of his shirt. ‘You’ll either fight them or me,’ he said ominously. And such was the steely inflexibility of Goddard’s voice and grip that the challenge went unanswered. ‘Okay, you guys,’ said the sergeant. ‘Get off your tails. We’re going in.’ Goddard strode amongst the Canadians. He harangued, derided and cajoled them. He told them that they reminded him of a bunch of old whores on a picnic. But he infused in them a fighting spirit that had long been absent.

‘Blimey,’ said Private Milroy admiringly, ‘old “Pop” thinks he’s a ------- general or somethink.’ ‘Take that gun a bit to the left, Jack,’ said Goddard to Milroy, ‘and give us covering fire. Pump it into ‘em as hard as you can. I’m going to take that hill.’ ‘And the best of luck,’ said Milroy, who had been on a charge for insubordination more than once. ‘You and who else?’ ‘Less of your lip,’ said Goddard. ‘Get on that gun.

Soon Milroy was firing long bursts up the hill. With Goddard at their head, the Canadians swarmed up the slope. They were halted at the crest by a hail of bullets which tore ugly gaps in their ranks, but the attack was pressed home at bayonet point and the Japanese were driven off. ‘Hell, I didn’t want to go into that attack,’ said a Canadian private afterwards. ‘But the spirit of the bastard was such that we had to.’ Which is praise.’

‘Monkey’ Stewart, ‘Mickey’ Man, Henry Marsh, Major Hedgecoe (the Black Prince), R.S.M Challis, Jack Milroy (the Black Mamba), the ‘onourable ‘orrible Marable, ‘Pop’ Goddard, Herbert Davies, the Welsh Parson; Sergeant Bert Bedward – these are the men the Middlesex talk lyrically of at reunions nearly twenty years later, for these are the men whose conduct in the battle was consistently brave and in the finest traditions of Diehards.’

Goddard’s recommendation for the Military Medal, made after is release from captivity, reads as follows: ‘For gallantry and good leadership. On 24th December 1941, this N.C.O with an officer of the Hong Kong Volunteer Defence Corps was in a position supporting a Company of the Royal Rifles of Canada. A strong Japanese attack developed against the Canadians who were driven out of their position. Corporal Goddard immediately displated commendable initiative, organised supporting fire and led the Canadians personally in the counter attack which was successful in regaining the position.’  His award was published in the London Gazette for 29th August 1946.

Christmas Eve saw no great change. The street fighting in Wanchai intensified, and the defenders in the hills above Central were pushed further back. Casualties were mounting fast. Dawn the next day saw the Stanley defenders pushed back further than St. Stephen’s (scene of not the biggest, but certainly the most sadistic, massacre of the fighting), the defenders in the hills pushed further west than Wanchai Gap, and the Wanchai defenders pushed west of Mount Parish, almost to where the Hopewell Centre is today.

By 15:15 Governor Sir Mark Young, after consultation with Maltby who himself had consulted with those defending Victoria, ordered the surrender.

In Stanley, cut off from normal communications, the fighting continued until early next morning. By 02:30 all firing had ceased. Hong Kong had been captured. Of the 14,000 defenders, 1,500 lay dead. Almost twice that number would die in the three years and eight months of captivity and deprivation that were to follow.

Goddard was amongst those men taken prisoner on the 25th December 1941, and would then spend the remainder of the war in captivity, suffering the harsh treatment meted out to the prisoners. Goddard was ferried across to Kowloon and initially incarcerated at Shamshuipo Camp in the northwestern part of the Kowloon Peninsula from 29th December 1941. In January 1941 this camp became rationalised as the main camp for British Army and Hong Kong Volunteer Defence Corps men, and was the main camp in Hong Kong during the war. Whilst in this camp, Goddard was under Major Boon, the British Officer appointed Camp Leader, and in Captain Webber’s block.  

Having decided that it made more sense to turn the POWs into slave labourers so that more Japanese might be freed up for the armed forces, a series of transportations to the Japanese homeland began.

The first, the Shi Maru, left Hong Kong in September 4th 1942 with 620 POWs aboard These were the ‘hard men’, many of whom had refused to sign the ‘no escape’ chit. The majority came from the Royal Scots, the Middlesex, and the Royal Artillery, with a handful from the Royal Navy and other units.

The second, the Lisbon Maru, sailed with 1,834 men on September 27th. Torpedoed by the SS214 Grouper on October 1st, it sunk of the Zhoushan archipelago on October 2nd with great loss of life.

The third transportation was on January 19th 1943, on the Tatsuta Maru, and included 1,180 men. This was also the first draft that included Canadians, although only one officer accompanied them.

Goddard was with the third draft which departed from Hong Kong on 19th January 1943, and sailed to Japan aboard the Tatsuta Maru. On his arrival in Japan he found himself sent to Osaka Main Camp at Chikko, where he remained till 17th May 1945, as part of the group of prisoners under Warrant Officer Fryer, Royal Artillery, and with Fryer, was then moved to the neighbouring camp at Akenbobe, from where he was liberated when the Japanese surrendered. Of his time as a prisoner of war, Goddard states in the sabotage section that he worked slowly, but other than that, ‘anything else not worth mentioning’.

However in the dedication in Carew’s book the following is mentioned in reference to why he dedicated the book to Goddard amongst others: ‘I narrowed the field down to three men: Sergeant Marable (known to a privileged few in the Sergeants’ Mess as ‘Horrible’), Corporal Goddard and Private Milroy. All served in the First Battalion (Duke of Cambridge’s Own) The Middlesex Regiment. In four years of captivity – years of appalling humilitation, malnutrition, misery, cruelty and privation – this indefatigable trio were ever present thorns in the sides of their captors. They reduced the Japanese to exasperation and, eventually, unwilling admiration. They indulged in insubordination and what the British Army euphemistically termed ‘dumb insolence’. They flagrantly sabotaged every Japanese working project with the most explicit Trade Union efficiency. They greeted beatings and deprivation of Red Cross parcels with loud and defiant raspberries and the ribald utterances that only instinctively spring to the lips of the indestructible East End Londoner. They devised an illicit still and drank to ultimate victory in a concoction which would have made red Biddy taste like still lemonade. The selection of these three men may cause an outcry from other military quarters. But they were representative of the type of man which the Japanese tried to humble – and so signally failed to do so. They were, in fact, British soldiers.’

In the newspaper article ‘Ex-Japanese P.O.W. Re-lives War Years’ as published in The Armagh Guardian and South Tyrone News for 24th November 1960, Goddard further recounted of his time in captivity.

‘Last night he recalled how he had seen fellow-prisoners beheaded for smuggling newspapers into the camp…. How another had to have his feet amputated with a jack knife without anaesthetic after being tortured…. How a guard who had shown them kindness was strung up by his thumbs to a flag-pole until he died. “Our food was just rice, 10 ozs. of it a day,” he recalls. “Day after day, week after week, and month after month.”

A former heavyweight boxer and member of the regimental rugby team he weighed just half of his original weight of 13 stone at the end of the war. “I saw one of my friends die at 36 pounds,” he says. “I wasn’t as badly off as others because I was a good thief,’ he says, recalling the time he stole rice rations from the dormitory of sleeping Japanese soldiers. “Actually we would eat anything, and some of the boys became experts on weeds and snakes.”

“Some of the Japanese could be bribed, with soap for instance which we used to make ourselves, or when they found out how to do this, with axes, locks, spoons, anything that they wanted we would make in camp. In return we got a few cigarettes.”

“This was when I was working in the Osako shipyards, one of the largest in the world, where there was always opportunity to steal pieces of scrap metal. Many of us indulged in a petty sabotage, petty because the punishment was so heavy. There were always minor ‘accidents’ and I can remember a corvette which had just been out on trials returning to port because the deck had worked loose with vibration – most of the rivets round the engines had been dummies.”

‘Goddard was working in copper mines when the war ended and after he had phoned General M’Arthurs’ headquarters at Yokahama a flight of American bombers swooped overhead and dropped supplies. “The most welcome sight, I’ll ever see.”

Goddard arrived home in the United Kingdom on 31st October 1945, and was granted 28 days leave, before being promoted to Sergeant on 20th August 1946, and seeing serving with the Home Counties Infantry Training Centre. Goddard was posted on release leave on 24th June 1947, and discharged on 31st October 1947.

 

Goddard went on to find work in farming and then with the Post Office as a Clerk out in Drumquin in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland, delivering letters round the area on a bicycle, and in 1955 joined the Post Office as a Clerical Officer in Armagh. Around the same time he then enlisted through ‘Special Enlistment’ with the Army Emergency Reserve into the Territorial Army on 21st August 1956 at Armagh, joining as a Sergeant (No.23465012) the 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, a unit of the Northern Ireland Brigade, being immediately appointed Drum Major of the Battalion Drum and Pipe Band.

It was for his work with the Pipe Band that Goddard was awarded the British Empire Medal in the New Years Honours List published in the London Gazette for 1st January 1963. The recommendation reads as follows:

‘Sergeant (Drum Major) Goddard joined the Middlesex Regiment in April 1936 and served with them until October 1947 when he was demobilised. During this period he served mostly in the Far East and was captured by the Japanese after the fall of Hong Kong. He was a prisoner from 1941 to 1945 and was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry during the attack by the Japanese on Hong Kong. In February 1956 Sergeant Goddard joined the 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers (TA) in Armagh and because of his previous military service and outstanding ability was promoted Sergeant straight away and given the appointment of Drum Major. Since that time Drum Major Goddard has worked ceaselessly to train the Drums and Pipes and maintain them at a high standard. In a country area such as this Battalion it is not easy to keep a Pipe Band together or get them together for training due to the amount of travelling involved. Nevertheless due to his untiring efforts Goddard has succeeded in maintaining a very efficient Band who have given public performances in many Ulster towns as well as in England and Wales when the Battalion has been at Annual Camp. By his own efforts he recently raised sufficient money to enable the Drums and Pipes to buy and have emblazoned a new set of drums. Goddard himself has attended every Annual Camp since 1956. In addition in 1959 he gave up a week of his own holidays to do an attachment with the Irish Guards in order that he might receive instruction in the duties of a Drum Major. Since he joined the Territorial Army he has averaged 380 drill attendances a year, 350 more than the annual basic requirement of 30. As Drum Major Goddard is largely responsible for the running of the Armagh Boys Brigade as well as being involved in various other voluntary activities the extra time he devoted to the Territorial Army above the minimum drills required is a good illustration of the service he has rendered to the Battalion since 1956. The Drums and Pipes are a great asset to the Battalion and one of which they are proud. The high standard they maintain and the many duties they undertake is almost entirely due to the enthusiasm and untiring efforts of Drum Major Goddard who is most strongly recommended for this award.’ His award was presented by Lieutenant General Anderson.

Goddard transferred into the Territorial Army and Army Volunteer Reserve on its formation in 1969, and in the same year was awarded the Efficiency Medal with T.A. & A.V.R suspension in April 1969, one of the first such awards, he having been discharged that same year on 13th February 1969.     

Goddard was a member of the Royal British Legion in Armagh, and later travelled with his wife out to Hong Kong to visit the War Memorial’s there, before travelling on to Australia to visit his daughter, and whilst there, he died suddenly.